Home > Publications > Correlates of Resilience in Police Officers from England and Pakistan: A Cross National Study

Correlates of Resilience in Police Officers from England and Pakistan: A Cross National Study

Dr. Sajida Naz & Dr. Helen Gavin

Abstract
A substantial amount of literature suggests profound psychological implications as a result
of constant exposure to trauma in police work. The literature in the west argues on the use of
therapeutic interventions at appropriate stages after the diagnosis or assessment, however
there is little or no insight about type of challenges faced by the Pakistani police. Considering
this gap, this study attempts to compare the nature of traumatic experiences, implications on
mental health and psychological resilience and lastly coping techniques as used by police
officers in Pakistan and England. Almost 613 police personnel from various ranks responded
to the survey conducted in the two countries` police force (300 from Pakistan and 313 from
the UK). Correlation and multiple regression analysis suggested strong association between
psychological resilience on mental health. Thematic analysis identified number of
organizational and personal strategies that can aid those who work in this field to cope more
effectively. These include family, friends, peer and organizational support, improved
psychological services, flexible work routine and indulging into healthy positive self-help
skills. The study also demonstrates that the religious beliefs and customs and local cultural
perceptions affect the tendency to seek psychological support. Some of the other culturally
woven practices include family cohesiveness, stereotyping beliefs regarding psychological
problems; collectivism etc. Need for further research into indigenous knowledge of police
trauma has been emphasized.

Keywords: Resilience, Police Officers, Coping, Trauma, Mental Health