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Personal-cum-Political Security & Blasphemy Laws in Pakistan: A Critical Analysis

Dr. Amir Ullah Khan, Mr. Sana Ullah & Mr. Kamran Abdullah

Abstract
The 1973 Constitution in Pakistan, grants the right to personal security and political
security, particularly freedom of speech. Such privileges of the citizens are conditional in
nature and can be revoked whenever the security of the state, the glory of Islam, public
order, or incitement to an offence is involved. The government legislated blasphemy laws
to ensure the glory of Islam in different eras. However, Pakistan citizens were subjected
to litigation and even death on the plea of blasphemy. This paper is divided into three
main parts: Part-I deals with the Conceptualisation of Personal and Political Securities.
Part-II sheds light on the brief critical evolution of blasphemy laws in Pakistan. Part-III
deals with the various case studies with respect to personal security (life security),
political security (freedom of speech), and blasphemy laws and offers a conclusion.