Home > Publications > The Somalia Phenomenon: Peacemaking Theory, Asymmetric Policy, Restorative Justice, and Paradigm Paralysis when Combating Lawlessness in a Fragmented Nation

The Somalia Phenomenon: Peacemaking Theory, Asymmetric Policy, Restorative Justice, and Paradigm Paralysis when Combating Lawlessness in a Fragmented Nation

Rick R. Ferrell and Robert D. Hanser

Abstract
A state of chaos and conflict has traditionally plagued the nation of Somalia. Most methods
of conflict resolution have had little positive impact on the nation’s sense of stability.
Because of this, asymmetrical policy formulation is suggested as a potential approach.
Asymmetrical policies entail those that are unconventional or irregular from commonly
accepted methods of conflict resolution. As a means of overcoming paradigm paralysis, the
use of Fuller’s peacemaking pyramid paradigm, derived from peacemaking criminological
literature, is presented as a viable option. While peacemaking theory is presented as a general
paradigm of approach, the use of restorative justice processes are presented as specific
techniques by which this paradigm should be implemented. The infusion of both
peacemaking theory and restorative justice techniques are, therefore, presented as an
effective means of developing asymmetrical conflict resolution policy and putting that
policy into action within the nation of Somalia.

Keywords: Somalia, Peacemaking Theory, Restorative Justice, Rule of Law