Home > Publications > Differential Associational in Learning Religious Extremism/Violent Behavior: A Case Study of Central Jail Rawalpindi

Differential Associational in Learning Religious Extremism/Violent Behavior: A Case Study of Central Jail Rawalpindi

Syed Imran Haider1, Munawar Hussain2 & Azhar Waqar3

Abstract
The study aims to explore the role of association with respect to family
members and peers in learning of violent extremist behavioral patterns. The
differential association theory, proposed by Sutherland has been applied in the
study advocating that extremist behavior is the product of learning from the family
members, peer groups and teachers. The qualitative methodology was used in the
study and 12 respondents who were extremists and terrorists were selected from
the central jail Rawalpindi for in depth interviews. The study found that the
extremist behavior is a learned behavior and mostly the extremists learn this
behavior from the family members, including parents and siblings, peer groups,
including class fellows and cousins and teachers. The study recommends that in
order to address the extremism, the micro and macro level strategies need to be
introduced by involving all the relevant stakeholders.

Keywords: Violent religious extremism, Association, Behavior, Family, Peers,