Home > Publications > Hate Crime Vs. Free Speech: A Case Study of Danish Cartoons in Pakistan

Hate Crime Vs. Free Speech: A Case Study of Danish Cartoons in Pakistan

Kam C. Wong & Fasihuddin

Abstract
This paper of first impression studied the reaction of public and police to Danish cartoons
crisis (2006, 2008) in Pakistan. The paper addresses four issues: (1) How did the Danish
cartoons incident developed? (2) Why did it attracted so much resentment and caused so
much damage in Pakistan? (3) How did the Pakistan government and police react to the
cartoon crisis? (4) What need to be done in the future to avoid such “cartoon crisis”? The
research finds that: (1) The Danish cartoons crises have a devastating impact on Pakistan’s
society. It is brought on by pre-existing anti-foreignism and religious intolerance. (2) The
Danish cartoon crisis was inflamed by political rhetoric during an election season. (3) The
police were ill prepared and not equipped to deal with the crisis. (3) Comparative speaking
the first “cartoon crisis” (2006) was more violent and less orderly than second “cartoon crisis
(2008). The politics of “cartoon crisis” making has matured. (4) The best way to avoid
future “cartoon crisis” is by open communication and hate crime legislation.

Keywords: Hate Crime, Agitation, Demonstration, Protest, Danish Cartoon.